Language Arts:  Adverbs - Tutorial
      Tutorial               Lessons              Quiz
Some Helpful Tools
Types of Adverbs
List of Prepositions: click here

Lessons: click here

Language Arts Homepage: click here
Functions of an Adverb
An adverb can modify a verb.
Well and Good
Well and good are two words that are often confused. 

 




Well describes a person's health, or it describes how the verb in the sentence is or was performed. 
This section will identify adverbs and show how they are used.

happily 
       
slightly  
   
noisily        
quickly 
  
kindly    
 
loudly     
quietly    
 
honestly   
 
sympathetically
Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.  They tell why, how, when, where, and to what extent.  Most adverbs end in ly
Below are some examples of adverbs that are not so easy to recognize.  These adverbs tell when an event will occur:
soon

before      
later

now    
tomorrow

today
only

barely

merely

seldom     
almost

scarcely

hardly

never    
just

nearly

ever

quite 
These adverbs represent a limited amount:
These adverbs describe an extent or degree:
extremely

exceedingly

absolutely
little

mostly

frequently
rather

very

often
in the morning      (tells when)

to the store    (tells where)

with relish and cheese    (tells how)
Prepositional phrases that function as adverb phrases. 
good - an adjective

well - an adverb 
Rules for Adverbs
positive

quietly

badly

well

little
comparative

more quietly

worse

better

less
superlative

most quietly

worst

best

least
This sentence tells the reader that Pam's diet has been limited to eating only crackers with cheese and nothing else.
She took a little tour around the museum.  
See a list of prepositions in the Some Helpful Tools section below. 
Good describes  a noun.  
That was a good book.
Janet is not feeling well today.
Chad plays the saxophone well

Izzy recited her lines in the play very well
Performance:
Health:
The carpenter worked diligently to finish the job.
The adverb diligently describes how the carpenter worked.  In this case, the adverb answers how.
An adverb can modify an adjective.
Stephanie is extremely talented
Talented is an adjective.  Extremely modifies talented.  It tells what degree of talent Stephanie possesses.
An adverb can modify an adverb.
The train will be arriving very soon.
The two adverbs placed together describe when the train is expected to arrive.
Adverbs follow the same form as adjectives when used to make a comparison.
In this sentence, tour is a noun and little modifies tour.  Therefore, little is used as an adjective. 
Reminder:  Place your adverb close to the word it is modifying.    
In the sentence above, putting only after cheese, tells the reader that Pam eats only cheese with her crackers.

Let's move only in front of eats.
Pam eats crackers with cheese only.
Pam only eats crackers with cheese.
Note:
When tomorrow is used as in the day following today, it is a noun.

When tomorrow is used as in sometime in the future, it is an adverb.
Note: Adverbs never modify nouns or pronouns.